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BRANDE : Video

January 12, 2014

What the Viral Ads of 2013 Tell Us About Video Marketing

Several publications and websites have released what they calculate to be the most shared video ads of 2013. I’ve watched them all — some for the 20th time — and I’ve discovered some factors that may be useful when you’re creating your own video content.

Fool Me Once…

Two successful 2013 ads featured pranks. MGM, which released a new version of Carrie this year, set up an elaborate illusion in a coffeehouse that made it appear that a young woman had Carrie-like magical powers — which terrified the unknowing customers. Meanwhile, Pepsi Max disguised NASCAR champion Jeff Gordon and had him take an unsuspecting car salesman on a high-speed test drive that left the salesman breathless.

Playwrights call audiences knowing something the characters don’t “dramatic irony” and it’s worked since Shakespeare’s time. But be careful: Ads like this can come off as mean-spirited tricks. Luckily, these two ads stay on the right side of the line.



Tug the Heartstrings

Some of the most viral ads of 2013 tried to make us cry. Dove’s “Real Beauty Sketches” ads illustrated that women often aren’t aware of their own beauty: A forensic sketch artist, hidden from his subjects, drew a sketch of a woman as she described herself. He then drew a sketch of the same woman, this time described by a stranger. Each time, the stranger’s sketch was more beautiful than the woman’s description of herself. The message was very powerful, making it the most viewed ad of all time.

Extra Gum’s “Origami” ad had another moving premise. It told the story of a father who makes origami cranes out of gum wrappers for his daughter over her entire childhood. As he packs her things for college, he finds a box full of the cranes; she kept all of them through the years.
Many of us remember the most funny or shocking or raunchy ads, but pure, unironic emotion can also be very effective. Especially when combined with…
Animals

Two of the most viral ads of 2013 touched us by featuring adorable animals. GoPro’s “Be a Hero” ad showed a firefighter, wearing the company’s new camera on his helmet, as he found and revived an unconscious kitten after a house fire. Budweiser’s “Brotherhood” spot, which aired during the Super Bowl, showcased the bond between a horse trainer as he raises a foal to become one of the brewer’s famous Clydesdales — and who remembers the trainer after years apart.

People love stories about animals, and about the connection between humans and their pets, so it’s no surprised that these ads were shared so widely.


Make ‘Em Laugh
Of course, comedy still sells. AT&T showed that with its series of “It’s Not Complicated” ads featuring children saying the darnedest things. Kmart delivered some clever wordplay with “Ship My Pants.” Ron Burgundy presented his usual clueless arrogance for a dozen Dodge Durango ads. And Doritos even got a joke across without any dialogue in its Super Bowl ad “Goat 4 Sale.” Humor, in all its forms, is the most shared content across the entire internet, so don’t be afraid to show your silly side.

Ads That Defy Description
Not every popular ad of 2013 falls neatly into one of these categories, of course. Did Geico’s “Hump Day” ad go viral because it starred a camel, or simply because it was funny? Was Evian’s “Baby & Me” so popular because it featured babies, or dancing, or dancing babies? And no other company staged a stunt this year like Volvo Truck’s “Epic Split,” in which Jean-Claude Van Damme does the splits between two 18-wheelers while they’re moving.


Length doesn’t seem to be a factor in creating shareable content. For example, Dove released a six-minute version of its “Real Beauty Sketches” that was almost as popular as the three-minute version. While the longer version never aired on TV, availability doesn’t seem to be factor in viral ads; But Geico’s “Hump Day” was on TV all the time — yet it was the second most-viewed internet ad of the year.

Ready to create some video content with a good chance of going viral? Whether you want to be emotional, feature an animal, or pull a prank, Brandemix can help. Contact us and we’ll talk.

December 23, 2013

The Most Popular Blog Posts of 2013

As 2012 comes to a close, let’s take a look back at the year’s most popular blog posts. The topics range from telling your brand story to embracing new technologies to engaging your employees. I hope these articles will help you become an employer of choice and attract top talent — and avoid some of the biggest social media mistakes. 

Here are the BrandeBlog’s six most-read posts of 2013.

Employer Branding: Recruiters Help You Tell the Right Story

One of the biggest recruiting trends of 2014 is employer branding: the promise your company makes to its employees. And one of the biggest trends in marketing is brand storytelling: the use of content and experiences to bring your brand to life. Combining these trends can bring a powerful presence to your talent acquisition. Here’s how to do it.

How to Become an Employer of Choice
A recent Gallup study found that only 47% of American workers are completely satisfied with their jobs. A MarketTools study found that 21% of employees had applied to another job in the past six months. Clearly, many employees are ready to look elsewhere for the next step in their careers. To attract the best of these workers — and make your current employees stay with you, follow these steps to become an employer of choice. 

Create Goodwill for Your Small Business with Community Involvement

For any small business to succeed, it must build goodwill with the surrounding community. You can have Facebook fans or catalogue customers all over the world, placing orders by phone and email, but if locals aren’t walking in the door, you’re doomed. Branding your business as a “hometown hero” can make a huge impression on your customer base and serve as an important differentiator in the marketplace.

Build an Employer Brand Fortress by Integrating with Your Corporate Brand

One question that gets asked in every employer branding workshop we hold is, “Where does our employer brand fit with our corporate brand?” Some companies create an employer brand slogan that lives only within recruiting or HR. That’s often against best practice, as it has no bearing on a true employer value proposition. A strong EVP is based on the unique elements of your culture and workplace, resonates with the people you would like more of, and integrates with the same value proposition to your consumer base. Integrating the two brands isn’t always easy, but it’s crucial to success.

Social Media PR Disasters: Applebee’s Wild Night
If it’s true that you can learn more from failure than from success, then there’s a lot to learn from Applebee’s mysterious midnight meltdown. After the restaurant chain’s controversial firing of a waitress, critics took to Applebee’s Facebook page to complain. In the early hours of Saturday, February 2, someone from Applebee’s tried to fight back. What happened next is a perfect example of what not to do in a PR crisis.

Recruiting with Google Glass
Google’s new wearable technology may change recruiting forever. Why? Because, as the economy improves and the competition for talent increases, Google Glass will allow organizations to show a job listing and a corporate culture instead of telling. From talent acquisition to employer branding, here’s how this amazing visual device can be used to engage job-seekers in several new and exciting ways.

What do these posts’ popularity tell us? That there a lot of people with an interest in  and a need for  social media trends, marketing, and branding. As it so happens, they are also specialties of ours! 
Want to be more popular to job-seekers, employees, and customer? Put Brandemix on your to-do list for 2014.

Thanks for reading and happy holidays.

August 6, 2013

Recruiting with Google Glass

I don’t say this very often, but it’s possible that recruiting is going to change forever, thanks to the “wearable visual technology” known as Google Glass.

Why? Because, as the economy improves and the competition for talent increases, Google Glass will allow organizations to show a job listing and a corporate culture instead of telling. From talent acquisition to employer brand, this technology can be used to engage job-seekers in several new and exciting ways:

 

A Day in the Life of an Employee
What does, say, an “associate director of strategic communications” actually do? A job posting for a position like that will likely have a long list of “Responsibilities,” “Requirements,” and “Qualifications.” But pictures can be worth a thousand words. Instead of a confusing job title followed by a page of unexciting text, companies can allow an employee to shoot a video of their daily routine using Google Glass. Job-seekers could see all the interesting, challenging, unexpected aspects of the job, which might not come across in a listing. A first-person video allows job-seekers to envision themselves working for the organization, a very powerful experience.

Meet Your Recruiter
Some brands, like Taco Bell, showcase their recruiters, putting a human face on what can be an intimidating process. Google Glass will let companies take that strategy to the next level, by showing what daily life is like for a recruiter. Job-seekers will get a behind-the-scenes look at the application and interview experience, seeing where to park, how employees dress, what the interview room looks like — even where the restrooms are. This sort of advance knowledge does wonders for nervous applicants who usually have no idea what to expect at an interview.

Your recruiter in her “natural habitat”!

Inside the C-Suite
At Brandemix, we sometimes have the pleasure of producing company videos that star the CEO. But not all business leaders are comfortable with the spotlight. Google Glass can put camera-shy executives at ease by letting them wear the camera! Job-seekers love sneak peeks and inside information, so the unprecedented access allowed by a CEO wearing Google Glass is sure to be a hit. And the executive doesn’t have to take time out of her day to recite lines under hot studio lights. Everybody wins.

Welcome to the Neighborhood

Some employers, like Ann Inc., make a point of showing off their office’s neighborhood. Google Glass gives employers a chance to move beyond photos. Videos can show what restaurants are nearby, how easy the commute is, and area secrets that only locals know. If job-seekers perceive a company’s location as a disadvantage, a Google Glass video can be an effective way to change their minds.

Ann Inc.’s “NYC Office Guide” board on Pinterest


As you can see, Google Glass can have a major effect on recruiting for any employers who adapt it early and use it wisely. After all, many people, including job-seekers, would rather watch than read. If your office is lovely and your employees are friendly, you should show them off! 

Want to learn more about Google Glass and other innovative talent acquisition strategies? Write to us.

July 10, 2013

Video: Vine vs. Instagram Video


Which short-form video platform is best for your organization’s branding, marketing, or recruiting efforts? Director of Interactive Branding Jason Ginsburg explains the key differences between Vine and Instagram.

May 22, 2013

Brandemix Bonus Reel: What is the Social Recruitment Monitor?

Special guest Ed Barzilaij, CEO of Maximum, explains how the new online tool his agency has created helps employers measure the engagement, interactivity, and reach of their social media recruiting efforts.